Top 10 largest ships. Naked Science

The supertanker Prelude, cruise ships Oasis and other sea giants are among the 10 largest ships in the world from Naked Science. The criteria by which the candidates were selected – maximum length and deadweight.

© Wikipedia
© Wikipedia

The key criterion for the allocation of seats was the maximum length of the ship, however, in some cases, the choice also depended on the value of the deadweight – the maximum mass that the ship can carry in order not to sink under the water below the dangerous line (deadweight includes not only cargo, but also fuel, mass of passengers , crew and provisions).

10. Mozah

Length: 345 m

Deadweight: 128900 t

Launched: 2007

Flag: Qatar

Status: in operation

Mozah is the first ship in the Q-Max family of tankers, which is designed to transport liquefied natural gas from fields near Qatar. Designed and built in South Korea. A total of 14 ships of the Q-Max type are currently in operation.

Q-Max Mozah / © Nakilat
Q-Max Mozah / © Nakilat

9. Queen Mary II

Length: 345 m

Deadweight: 19189 t

Launched: 2002

Flag: Bermuda

Status: in operation

One of the largest passenger liners in the world, the Queen Mary 2 transatlantic cruise ship is capable of transporting up to 2,620 passengers across the ocean with all the amenities. Designed and built by the French company Chantiers de l’Atlantique. In addition to 15 restaurants, a casino and a theater, Queen Mary 2 also has the first ship planetarium on board.

Top 10 largest ships
Queen Mary 2 / © Tronheim Havn
Queen Mary 2 / © Tronheim Havn

8. Allure of the Seas

Length: 362 m

Deadweight: 19750 t

Launched: 2008

Flag: Bahamas

Status: in operation

The Oasis cruise ship class includes two twin ships, and both are the largest of their class in the world. True, Allure of the Seas is still 50 millimeters longer than Oasis in the Seas, which is why it takes the eighth position. The maximum number of passengers that this liner can carry is 6296 people, and the crew is 2384. To list all the entertainment offered on board, you will need to write a separate article – this is a real floating city: from an ice rink, a golf course and many shops and bars to a whole park with exotic trees and other unusual plants.

Allure of the Seas / © Daniel Christensen
Allure of the Seas / © Daniel Christensen

7. Vale Sohar

Length: 362 m

Deadweight: 400315 t

Launched: 2012

Flag: Marshall Islands

Status: in operation

This vessel belongs to the family of the largest dry cargo vessels, which in turn belongs to the Brazilian mining company Vale. Designed to transport ore from Brazil to the USA. A total of 30 similar ships have already been built with deadweight varying between 380 and 400 thousand tons. Sohar is one of the ships of the family with the maximum deadweight.

Vale Sohar / © Dmitry Lakhtikov
Vale Sohar / © Dmitry Lakhtikov

6. TI Class

Length: 380 m

Deadweight: 441 585 t

Launched: 2003

Flag: Marshall Islands and Belgium

Status: 2 in operation, 2 converted to floating platforms

TI Class double-hull ships are currently the largest operating ships in the world in terms of deadweight and gross tonnage. A total of 4 identical ships were commissioned: TI Oceania, TI Africa (under the flag of the Marshall Islands) and TI Asia, TI Europe (under the flag of Belgium). In 2010, Asia and Africa met the fate of their transformation into floating storage and offloading platforms (FSOs) and now serve as one of the offshore oil fields near Qatar.

TI Asia (right) / © Naviearmatori.net / Lillo
TI Asia (right) / © Naviearmatori.net / Lillo

5. Emma Maersk

Length: 397 m

Deadweight: 156907 t

Launched: 2006

Flag: Denmark

Status: in operation

The first of 8 identical E-Class container ships from the Danish company Moller-Maersk Group. In 2006, when Emma Maersk set sail for the first time, the ship was the largest operating vessel in the world. Carries various cargoes between Northern Europe and Asia through the Strait of Gibraltar and the Suez Canal. This ship has a rather bad reputation: during its construction, there was a major fire, and in 2013, as a result of damage to one of the engines, it lost controllability right in the Suez Canal. There was no talk of flooding, however, and management was restored. In Europe, Emma has been criticized for using sulfurous fuels.

Emma Maersk / © Maerskline
Emma Maersk / © Maerskline

4. Esso Atlantic

Length: 406.5 m

Deadweight: 516891 t

Launched: 1977

Flag: Liberia

Status: dismantled for scrap

Once the world’s largest ship by deadweight, the oil supertanker Esso Atlantic was built in Japan in the mid-1970s, but made its first direct voyage from Liberia, under whose flag it was registered by Esso Tankers. He was mainly engaged in the transportation of oil between Europe and the countries of the Middle East. In 2002 it was scrapped in Pakistan. Also, there was an almost identical ship Esso Pacific, but the Atlantic’s deadweight value is slightly higher, so it took the fourth position.

Esso Atlantic / © Photobucket / Auke Visser
Esso Atlantic / © Photobucket / Auke Visser

3. Pierre Guillaumat

Length: 414.2 m

Deadweight: 555 051 t

Launched: 1977

Flag: France

Status: dismantled for scrap

This supertanker was the largest in deadweight among the family of nearly identical French ships Batillus. Built by the French company Chantiers de l’Atlantique, “lived” only 5 years and was dismantled for scrap in South Korea in 1983; the same fate befell the rest of the family (Prairial, Bellamya, Batillus). Such a short service life is explained by the fact that the commercial utility of the supertanker was minimal: it could not pass through either the Suez or the Panama Canal.

Postcard depicting Pierre Guillaumat / © Delcampe
Postcard depicting Pierre Guillaumat / © Delcampe

2. Seawise Giant (Knock Nevis)

Length: 458.5 m

Deadweight: 564 763 t

Launched: 1979

Flag: Sierra Leone (last country of registration)

Status: dismantled for scrap

Until recently, it was the longest ship in history. The supertanker Seawise Giant was so huge that its length was compared to the tallest buildings in the world. The ship could not fit in either the Suez or the Panama Canal; even the English Channel turned out to be “Giant” not in tonnage. During the Iran-Iraq War in 1988, the ship was seriously damaged by an Iraqi Air Force missile while it was transporting Iranian oil in the Persian Gulf. As a result, the ship sank near the coast, but shortly after the war, Norman International was able to tow it to Singapore, where the ship was repaired and put back into operation in 1991, already with a new optimistic name – “Happy Giant” Subsequently, the ship was turned into a floating platform, and in 2009 the Giant set off on its last journey – to the shores of India, where it was later dismantled for scrap.

Comparison of the length of the Seawise Giant (Knock Nevis) with the tallest buildings in the world
Comparison of the length of the Seawise Giant (Knock Nevis) with the tallest buildings in the world
Jahre Viking - one of the former names of the ship Happy Giant / © DidierPinon
Jahre Viking – one of the former names of the ship Happy Giant / © DidierPinon

1. Prelude

Length: 488 m

Deadweight: 600,000 t

Launched: hull only, 2013

Flag: not received yet

Status: under construction

Prelude is the world’s first floating platform not only for transportation, but also for the production and liquefaction of natural gas directly on board. South Korean Samsung Heavy Industries is under construction for Royal Dutch Shell. Essentially a mobile gas processing plant, Prelude is already the largest floating facility ever built by man. By 2017, when the construction of all high-tech components on the hull is complete, the first seabed drilling is planned off the coast of Australia.

Comparison of Prelude length and tallest buildings
Comparison of Prelude length and tallest buildings
Prelude Corpus / © AFP / Getty images
Prelude Corpus / © AFP / Getty images
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